“I Voted” Sticker Template (Free)

My 10th graders will participate in a student mock election for the U.S. Presidential Election on Tuesday and I was stumped on how to make the experience more memorable for them when I found this amazing “I Voted” sticker template on TpT. Since adults receive an “I Voted” sticker to showcase their commitment to civic responsibility, what better than to provide students a similar opportunity?

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I can only imagine how ecstatic my students will be on Tuesday when they receive these stickers. The stickers from this template were far better than the one I received during early voting last week and best of all, this template was free. 

Printing the template was extremely easy.  I used standard Avery 5160 mailing labels (1 inch tall x 2 5/8 inches wide) that were recommended and the final results were absolutely gorgeous. (My photo does not do these stickers justice.) 

If you would like something similar for your students, I highly recommend downloading this template from Kaylynn Hamstra’s TpT Store Enjoy 🙂

 

Free Printable: Weekly To Do List

I was tired of using random pieces of paper, so I created a simple and functional weekly “To Do” list.  I hope it’s useful for you. Enjoy. 🙂

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Simply click the preview of the template or the download link below.

[embeddoc url=”https://ateacherslife.edublogs.org/files/2016/11/To-Do-List-ytkqdq.pdf” width=”99%” download=”all” viewer=”google”]

Free Printable for Student Absences

Now that I’m at an Early College and see my students only 2-3 times per week, keeping track of absent work and copies for absent students has become a nightmare. Although I use technology like Schoology and Remind to help students keep track of their day-to-day assignments, these apps do not fully resolve the problem of keeping absent students up-to-date with the actual happenings of the classroom. 

While I make a concerted effort to keep the Schoology class calendar as updated as possible, my use of technology was never meant to be a substitute for attending class. I do not post every instructional adjustment that I make nor do I announce pop quizzes on the calendar.  However, it is extremely challenging and time consuming to individually update multiple students from different classes what was missed during their absence.

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Click image to download document.

To resolve this problem, I decided to try a “While You Were Out Form.” Unfortunately, I could not find a form that was functional and appropriate for high school students. Much of what I found online was designed for an elementary setting, so I designed my own. It’s free of fancy clip art, but I think the clean design will serve its purpose in class.  

Since I use a classroom jobs system, I have “hired” a detail oriented student helper for each class period to fill out the form as class progresses. Once the form is completed, I help the student attach any handouts given during class and I place the completed packet into our classroom mailbox system for later pickup.

Tip: If you have multiple student absences within a class period, do not have your student helper add a name to the form. This allows you to make copies of the completed form for several students without the need of additional student helpers. Once you have made copies, simply add each student’s name and attach any handouts for that day. 

If you would like a copy of this “While You Were Out Form,” please click here or visit my Teachers Pay Teachers Store. You can also click on the image in this post for a direct download as well.  Enjoy!!! 🙂

I Was Booed…

I’ve never been overly excited about Halloween, but I’d like to take a moment to share something that really brightened my day—I was booed.

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I’m not sure who started this at my school, but I’d love to say thank you. This small gesture truly cheered me up and it was just what I needed before I had to administer PSATs this morning. It’s always appreciated when a gesture of kindness unexpectedly comes my way and I am extremely excited to pay it forward. I hope this post inspires you to do something kind for your fellow teachers regardless of what holiday is on the horizon. In Texas, we are at the end of the quarter (9 weeks marking period) and I think we could all use a boost in morale. 🙂

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Meet Your Teacher

I decided to introduce myself to my Early College students and parents a little differently this year. Instead of a PowerPoint, I decided to use a “Meet the Teacher” handout. Although I was able to find a few templates online, none of them were well suited for a high school audience (a little too elementary oriented). So, ultimately, I ended up making my own from that collective inspiration and I was able to customize it exactly the way that I wanted.

**This version omits my school’s contact information, but it is present on the final version that I will print and pass out on paper. I also plan to electronically post this handout for parents on Bloomz.**

So what do you think? Do you like my “Meet Your Teacher” introduction handout? I know it is rather simple, but I truly hope my students and parents enjoy reading it. 🙂 

PS. If you are interested in using this template for your classroom, please visit my Teachers Pay Teachers store

meet the teacher (blog version)

Teach Like Me

Gandhi so aptly said, “Be the change you wish to see in the world.” As teachers, we use this quote nearly to the point of cliché. However, how often do we apply this concept beyond working with our students?

Given the critical nature of the press and public towards teaching, maybe it’s time we do more than transform our classroom. Maybe it’s time we also transform the public perception of our profession.

One of the ways we can begin this process is by participating in a positive PR campaign like “Teach Like Me.” A friend sent me an invite through Facebook and I liked it enough to share with you. 1

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This spring, “Teach Like Me” will launch its 2nd annual campaign to publicize and increase public awareness of the positive contributions teachers make. On May 5, 2015, “Teach Like Me” asks educators and supporters to change their profile pictures on social media sites like Facebook, Instagram and Twitter to one of their custom Teach Like Me logos (available here). Then use social media with the hashtag #TeachLikeMe to share/tweet/post what you teach and why you love teaching. However parents, students and other members of the public can also use the hashtag to show their support, appreciation, and encouragement of teachers. For more information on “Teach Like Me,” please visit http://www.teachlikeme.org.

I am excited about participating and I hope you are too! 🙂

  1. I am not an official ambassador or an affiliate of “Teach Like Me,” but I like their idea.